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20 Super Important Questions to Ask Hiring Managers & Clients


Read all 20 questions & download a fillable form for your next intake




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Download Intake Form


20 Super Important Questions to Ask Hiring Managers & Clients


Read all 20 questions & download a fillable form for your next intake



Open eBook

Download Intake Form

 

Who’s more responsible during the hiring process: the hiring manager or the recruiter?

Before we point fingers, let’s just agree that the talent landscape is changing… which means the role of a recruiter is changing, too. A communication upgrade is long overdue.

Now more than ever, quality candidates have a voice. They’re in high demand right now, and they know it. Open positions have a ton of details attached to them—important ones, at that. If recruiters want to see a successful placement in their futures, they have to stay on top of what matters.


 

Who’s more responsible during the hiring process: the hiring manager or the recruiter?



Before we point fingers, let’s just agree that the talent landscape is changing… which means the role of a recruiter is changing, too. A communication upgrade is long overdue.

Now more than ever, quality candidates have a voice. They’re in high demand right now, and they know it. Open positions have a ton of details attached to them—important ones, at that. If recruiters want to see a successful placement in their futures, they have to stay on top of what matters.


 

20 Questions to Ask Hiring Managers & Clients

 
 

Back to basics

If you started recruiting before these next steps, stop. You're not prepared yet.

Research the company
Look for things like locations of corporate offices, financials, recent company-wide news, and the number of employees. If you were already given background research, conduct your own to cross-check.

Review the job description/position profile
The job description should include:

    • Company background
    • Position summary
    • Reporting relationships
    • Major repsonsibilities
    • Ideal experience
    • Critical competencies for success
    • Short-term objectives
Don’t see some of those? Not good. Get in touch with the hiring manager or client ASAP to ask for the missing details. If they’re all there, awesome. Keep reading.
 

 

...We're still doin' basics

Next up is a clarification call. Even if you already have some of this info, accuracy is never a bad thing. Ask the client or hiring manager these overview questions:

Basic Overview Q's

    • What's the job title?
    • How many positions are we recruiting for?
    • What’s the location of the role(s)?
    • Who will candidates report to?
    • Will the candidate be an individual contributor or have a direct report?
    • What’s the team structure? How many peers will the candidate have?
    • Why is the position open (e.g. acquisition, company growth, termination of employee, etc.)? If it’s a replacement, find out why the employee was terminated.
    • How long has the position been open?
    • Is the team dealing with any major or unique difficulties (e.g. high turnover or lack of experience within the team)?
    • Will they have budget or P/L responsibilities?
    • Are there advancement opportunities?
 

 

Level up

After those simple follow-up questions, it's time to move on up and chat with the client or hiring manager to assess their wants vs. their needs.
 

 

Download 20 Super Important Questions to Ask Hiring Managers & Clients


We'd love to tell you the remaining questions to ask hiring managers and clients, but you have to click that button down there to open the eBook 😉.
 


 

Why These 20 Questions Matter AKA Why You Read This


You probably landed here for any of these reasons: you know how frustrating it is to feel disconnected from the client or hiring manager, you’ve seen the snowball effect of a recruitment-gone-wrong, or because you’re trying to avoid all that noise and do your job the right way. Whatever the reason, just know one thing:

Communication can always be improved. Don’t play the blame-game. It doesn’t matter who’s responsible for what; be the one who initiates positive change. All you have to do is ask the client or hiring manager 20 basic (some not-so-basic) questions.